The July 2016 issue of History of the Human Sciences (Volume 29, Issue 3) is now published. Abstracts of research articles, plus links to the full text, are below. Elwin Hofman (KU Leuven) - 'How to do the history of the self'' The history of the self is a flourishing field. Nevertheless, there are some problems that have proven difficult to overcome, mainly concerning teleology, the universality or particularity of the self and the gap between ideas and experiences of the self. In this article, I make two methodological suggestions to address these issues. First, I propose a ‘queering’ of the self, inspired by recent developments in the history of sexuality. By destabilizing the modern self and writing the histories of its different and paradoxical aspects, we can better attend to continuities and discontinuities in the history of the self and break up the idea of a linear and unitary history. I distinguish 4 overlapping and intersecting axes along which discourses of

the self present themselves: (1) interiority and outer orientation; (2) stability and flexibility; (3) holism and fragmentation; and (4) self-control and dispossession. Second, I propose studying 4 ‘practices of self’ through which the self is created, namely: (1) techniques of self; (2) self-talk; (3) interpreting the self; and (4) regulating practices. Analysing these practices allows one to go beyond debates about experience versus expression, and to recognize that expressions of self are never just expressions, but make up the self itself. Egbert Klautke (University College London) - '"The Germans are beating us at our own game" - American eugenics and the German sterilization law of 1933' This article assesses interactions between American and German eugenicists in the interwar period. It shows the shifting importance and leading roles of German and American eugenicists: while interactions and exchanges between German and American eugenicists in the interwar period were important and significant, it remains difficult to establish direct American influence on Nazi legislation. German experts of…

We were delighted to publish an in-depth review essay by Colin Gordon, on the new Cambridge Foucault Lexicon, in the July 2016 issue of HHS (Gordon is, among other things, an internationally-renowned scholar of Foucault; he is editor of Power/Knowledge [Pantheon] and co-editor of The Foucault Effect [Chicago]). We were even more delighted that when our colleagues at Sage made the essay open access, a status that will be retained through the end of 2016. You can now access the essay, without subscription, here: http://hhs.sagepub.com/content/29/3/91.full.pdf+html